2018/08/24

Re-Infusable Tea -Sen ga Kiku-


Brewing tea in Chinese way…..this is recent “my thing”, especially when I make wakocha.

Of course, it really depends on the tea, but many Wakocha are produced in Chinese style, not Indian one, and focus on more delicate flavor rather than good body. The appearance of the leaves are bigger like many of Taiwanese black, you can re-infuse several times because the leaves open up slowly. By doing this, you will enjoy the changing of taste of infusion.

By the way, we say "sen ga kiku" in Japanese for "re-infusable tea". (lit: sen=infusion, kiku= work).
 
Taiwanese tea pot, not Japanese "hohin" (tea pot without handle)

Of course, I also like English style, which means brew it usually one time. But you may get the different taste by brewing it in Chinese way including "gaiwan" style.

When you think the tea you have can "sen ga kiku", why don't you enjoy changing the taste?






2018/08/18

Wazuka Kocha in Kyoto


Time flies! It’s been more than two month since I posted last! My brain hadn't been working enough because of this intense heat.

Anyway…..

Unlike Shizuoka and Kyushu area, you don’t see many Japanese black tea known as “wakocha” yet in Kyoto. Matcha is still king there.

When you feel like Wakocha in Kyoto, you should visit “Tea house LIPTON”. Two kinds of the teas called “Wazuka-kocha” are served there. Both of them are produced by Mr. Sugimoto, a tea farmer in Wazuka city in Kyoto.

One is “MIKI”. It’s very gentle and has a short finish.

The other one is “MIOKU”.


I had this “MIOKU” with a Matcha cake. The tea has a light body, but has a refreshing and distinguish aroma, a gentle sweetness, and a hint of pleasant bitterness.




The tea house has various tea menu items including Assam, Darjeeling, Earl Grey and so on…..but when you happen to be in Kyoto, why don’t you try “Wazuka-kocha”?

* Tea House LIPTON: http://www.lipton-teahouse.jp/