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Brush Your Tea-th Clean !?

You know tea can be anything, and now “tea stuff” is everywhere. I know you won’t be surprised to see this. But..... please allow me to post about this. It’s a tea toothpaste. 




After enjoying tea latte, eating matcha ice cream, having tea-flavored sweets with tea and whatever, brush your teeth with the tea toothpaste. It will be your perfect tea day!!

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A Sign of Good Luck -Chabashira-

Have you seen a tea stalk floating vertically in your teacup when you have Japanese green tea? When you see it, you will have a good day. Because it is believed to be a lucky sign.

A tea stalk floating vertically is called chabashira (lit: tea pillar).  Seeing a chabashira, we feel happy, saying “Engi(luck) ga (is) ii (good).”

The origin of this expression is unknown, but some say it is because that the situation is rare. Others say that a pillar for chabashira can be considered the central pillar of a house. We liken a chabashira floating vertically to a house pillar standing vertically, considering it is good.

Whatever the reasons, when you find a chabashira, be happy!

Hope all of us will enjoy our tea lives in 2014:-)


Kombucha - in English vs in Japanese -

Have you tried kombucha before? I suppose kombucha you may know could be “fermented tea”, but for Japanese, it’s not. It’s a drink made from powdered kelp called kombu

What you call kombucha was popular when I was a kid as “kocha-kinoko”, literally means “black tea mushroom”. Sounds weird, doesn’t it? It was not appetizing AT ALL to me, as a little girl. Due to such a weird name, I remember its existence, but I was too scared to try back then. 
Recently, I found a canned kombucha made in the US. I am already grown up enough to try, and I did. I did green tea and lemon flavored one. Unfortunately I didn’t taste any green tea, but as a drink it was good. Much better than I expected. 
BTW, Japanese kombucha is also good to drink and to season foods. When you have a chance, give it a try!




* FYI  -frm Wikipedia -

<History>  It is not known exactly how or where kombucha originated from.The drink was consumed in east Russia at least as early as 1900, and from there entered Europe.
<Etymo…

Matcha or Maccha

Do you spell “matcha” or “maccha"?
The other day, I was asked which one is correct from the perspective of Japanese language. I replied, “I guess either is fine." 
As long as I know, the spelling of “matcha” is more common while the other one is not often seen here in Japan. However, I just learned that a new tearoom opened in Kyoto. It is named “Maccha House.”  ------  OK, I have to research now. 
Japanese language has a double [long] consonant known as sokuon that English doesn’t. In order to represent sokuon in English, there is a basic rule that the consonant has to be doubled. (based on Hepburn System) For example;  * kite ( "come") – /kite/ * kitte ( "postage stamp") – /kitːe/ or /kitte/ * asari ( "clams") – /asaɽi/ * assari ( "easily") – /asːaɽi/ or /assaɽi/                       (Reference: Wikipedia)
If you follow this rule, “maccha” seems to be correct, but there is an exception. In case of the sound of “cha”, ”chi”, “chu”, “che” and…